Test post

Just a test post to check something out. I’m going to babble on a little here to make sure the lines wrap. In fact – hey, I have an idea!

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Mauris blandit nunc. Donec eu metus. Proin non tortor. Maecenas commodo. Quisque at velit eu turpis cursus porttitor. Suspendisse potenti. Praesent congue. Mauris aliquam, risus ut condimentum porta, odio neque sollicitudin nulla, at molestie ante urna ac mi. Aenean eleifend facilisis dui. Sed elementum ultrices nisl. Class aptent taciti sociosqu ad litora torquent per conubia nostra, per inceptos hymenaeos. Etiam lorem pede, consectetuer quis, dignissim fermentum, lobortis quis, orci. Duis egestas arcu eget tortor. Quisque odio diam, sodales sit amet, molestie nec, convallis vel, arcu. Proin id justo. Morbi rhoncus consectetuer nibh. Vivamus vestibulum libero at urna. Ut placerat diam quis odio eleifend dapibus. Phasellus nec mauris.

Now here’s another paragraph to gap the blockquotes, and you’re about to see the lorem ipsum placeholder again…

“Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Mauris blandit nunc. Donec eu metus. Proin non tortor. Maecenas commodo. Quisque at velit eu turpis cursus porttitor. Suspendisse potenti. Praesent congue. Mauris aliquam, risus ut condimentum porta, odio neque sollicitudin nulla, at molestie ante urna ac mi. Aenean eleifend facilisis dui. Sed elementum ultrices nisl. Class aptent taciti sociosqu ad litora torquent per conubia nostra, per inceptos hymenaeos. Etiam lorem pede, consectetuer quis, dignissim fermentum, lobortis quis, orci. Duis egestas arcu eget tortor. Quisque odio diam, sodales sit amet, molestie nec, convallis vel, arcu. Proin id justo. Morbi rhoncus consectetuer nibh. Vivamus vestibulum libero at urna. Ut placerat diam quis odio eleifend dapibus. Phasellus nec mauris.”

Hmm. Interesting. My page isn’t validating at the moment (unencoded ampersands, tsk), but seems effectively clean, and my CSS validates. OmniWeb and Safari both render drop-caps on those blockquotes, but the ‘first-letter’ is apparently interpreted as ‘up-to-and-including-the-first-genuine-letter,’ rather than ‘first-character’ as I’d expected. IE6/Win and FireFox/Win ignore it completely. Anybody?

Lorem Ipsum text via Lipsum.com.

9 Comments on "Test post"


  1. Weird. It seems to be on the site’s end though. ( Not an issue with the browser viewing it, but with the code generated on a per browser basis) The page source generated on IE explicitly dropcaps the J, but not the L’s.
    Maybe OS related( Macs get different source?)

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  2. The first letter of a post is extracted by a Movable Type plugin, and explicitly styled differently to the rest of the paragraph. That is, it’s a nasty kludge. The blockquote style uses the first-letter CSS pseudo-element to change the presentation of the (natch) first letter. So, the one that works is explicitly defined by the server; the ones that mostly don’t are implicit in the stylesheet.
    What strikes me as weird is this: as far as I can tell, one of the few uses of the first-letter pseudo-element is to produce drop-caps. But without a complementary first-paragraph pseudo-element it seems a bit useless; one rarely wants a drop-cap on every paragraph. That the browser rendering fails to behave as expected merely confounds the issue.

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  3. Thought so. IE is being overly precise.( And IMHO regretably more correct as well). IE is rendering it correctly. All Text that is in the block quotes, but not in the [P] contained within will render using the [BLOCKQUOTE] rules, trhe stuff in the paragraphs renders according to the [p] rules first and foremost. MAybe an aplication of first child?

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  4. Try using lower case for the tags rather than uppercase, since the site is coded in XHTML rather than HTML, and uses XML everywhere.
    The code looks like it’s doing that anyway, and I’ve noticed some sillies on my site when I was first coding in HTML.

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  5. Nah, I think Jim’s right. You’re correct, Alan, that XHTML requires lower-case tags, but like I say, apart from some unencoded ampersands the site validates per its DTD (my desktop blog tool is uploading as UTF-8, but I suspect MT isn’t playing ball).
    And in fact, Jim’s version makes sense, and sounds like the sort of head-beatingly stupid mistake I’d make. I’ll try it and see; thanks, Jim!

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  6. That’s a Safari version thing; in 1.2.3 they render the same as OmniWeb – no surprise, since OmniWeb is using the same version of WebKit.
    I forget that people tend not to bother upgrading their Macs’ OS – I wonder what the distribution is between the four releases of X? Come the day of 10.4, however, I think we’ll all want to move. Perhaps not at first, since there’s not a huge amount of fun twiddly stuff apparent, but the search and data storage APIs are the sorts of things developers will do deeply cool things with, and those apps will only run on 10.4 and up.

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